Reducing Head CT Use for Children With Head Injuries in a Community Emergency Department - American Board of Medical Specialties

This evaluation of a quality improvement (QI) effort for Maintenance of Certification (MOC) found that coaching and mentoring from a regional hospital (i.e., Seattle Children’s Hospital) participating in the MOC Portfolio Program had a significant effect on a successful QI effort at a community hospital assisted by resources from the regional hospital. In this case the QI effort achieved reducing the number of head CT scans beyond its stated goals.

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